jasmine-blu:

Post-Apocalyptic images of Japan Source

This is what Paradise looks like to me.

(Source: featherheadd)

fannishminded:

locker-panda:


Netflix took April Fool’s a bit too far this year.

Now that’s just mean

Too soon, man, too soon.

fannishminded:

locker-panda:

Netflix took April Fool’s a bit too far this year.

Now that’s just mean

Too soon, man, too soon.

(Source: crocs5evabruh)

Yesterday

My daughter fell flat on her face
for the first time ever
scraped her tiny nose, her forehead, her chin
and cried, mostly from anger and bewilderment
not pain, although it was surely a factor
but she found a way to cope
looking at a statue of a bird
a dog barking in its yard
leaves blowing in the wind
and I wondered at her wonder
and at the mystery
that at some point, growing up
some of us forget how to forget
our hurts
our anger
our confusion
we carry our scars everywhere
our aching bones and muscles
our bitter hearts and missing teeth
our slowly drowning wishes
our slowly dying dreams

I have so much left to learn

So, I’m thinking Shadowrun.

hierarchical-aestheticism:

derwiduhudar:

Wolves and Ravens: A Curious Relationship (Video)

The raven is sometimes known as “the wolf-bird.” Ravens, like many other animals, scavenge at wolf kills, but there’s more to it than that.

 Both wolves and ravens have the ability to form social attachments and they seem to have evolved over many years to form these attachments with each other, to both species’ benefit.

There are a couple of theories as to why wolves and ravens end up at the same carcasses. One is that because ravens can fly, they are better at finding carcasses than wolves are. But they can’t get to the food once they get there, because they can’t open up the carcass. So they’ll make a lot of noise, and then wolves will come and use their sharp teeth and strong jaws to make the food accessible not just to themselves, but also to the ravens.

Ravens have also been observed circling a sick elk or moose and calling out, possibly alerting wolves to an easy kill. The other theory is that ravens respond to the howls of wolves preparing to hunt (and, for that matter, to human hunters shooting guns). They find out where the wolves are going and following. Both theories may be correct.

Wolves and ravens also play. A raven will sneak up behind a wolf and yank its tail and the wolf will play back. Ravens sometimes respond to wolf howls with calls of their own, resulting in a concert of howls and calls.

Sources: Mind of the Raven, Bernd Heinrich, The American Crow and the Common Raven, Lawrence Kilham

Source

Odin, that’s why

Goddamn right.